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How long before i get "good" at sparring?

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#1
luke_w19

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When i say good at sparring, i don't mean i want to kick every ones asses, because i know enough that sparring is not about that, i.e its essentially just live training. What i do mean is how long until i can stand my own, how long until its me who  gets to almost dictate the way the sparring round goes? how long until i stop being a human punching bag? :P

I've had a grand total of three one hour technical sessions, and followed by 3 hours of sparring. I think a lot of people will tell me i shouldn't be sparring so soon after only 3 hours of learning technique, and honestly you are probably right because the sparring isn't exactly giving me black eyes but i'm leaving with some blood coming out my nose and a minor headache. But the same happened for me when i first started Brazilian jujitsu, i was thrown into the deep end, got smashed a fair bit and now, although still a white belt, i feel as if i can hold my own and understand at least what is happening to me when i do get smashed to bits.

Although i probably don't know any better, i feel as if i did a few months of the technical sessions and then dropped into sparring, i'd still feel as if im getting just constantly whacked in, so i'd rather just get whacked in now and learn, in a baptism of fire sort of way. I'm assuming if i just keep turning up to the sparring and technical sessions ill just learn to deal with all of this.

What do you think about this?


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#2
TZ22

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My first thought that there really isn't a "shortcut" or estimated number of hours before one becomes comfortable at sparring because there're so many elements that go into it, like making sure you're executing your movements with correct technique, practice proper defence, working on timing/angling, etc, and all of that takes time (I am still getting my ass kicked at times and I've been training for almost 5 years now, lol), and everyone progresses at their own pace, some people are more "natural", while some take a bit more time. What worries me more is the fact that you're leaving each sparring session with a headache and a bloody nose, which to me suggests that either your sparring partners are going way too hard, in which case you need to say something as the sparring session is not intended for going 100% each time, it is not a fight, it is however, a time to work on all of the things that I mentioned above and it's hard to do that when you are constantly going at 100%, you shouldn't be feeling like your are fighting for your life in a sparring session...and also, you can't really condition your brain and the constant headaches after sparring are indicative of either subconcussive damage or a concussion (depending on what other symptoms you get in addition to the headaches), which will make for a rather short "career" in fighting or even being able to train for fun if you are not planning to fight as all that damage to the head is cumulative and I would say that if you are going to fight, save the heavy shots to the head for your fights, not sparring...or alternatively, though I don't know whether it is the case for you, if you are yourself going with the same power as you would use on the pads in the sparring session because it seems to be the case with many beginners I saw that just don't know better, then it would be a natural response for you sparring partner to hit back hard if you are hitting them hard, so then things are just escalating and there is no working on the technique, etc.

#3
NewThai

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Reduce power, work on defense and proper techniques. Most people have to train 12-18 months at our gym before they are allowed to spar (varies by their natural ability and if they have prior experience). You can't regenerate brain cells so don't waste them on bad sparring.

#4
luke_w19

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My first thought that there really isn't a "shortcut" or estimated number of hours before one becomes comfortable at sparring because there're so many elements that go into it, like making sure you're executing your movements with correct technique, practice proper defence, working on timing/angling, etc, and all of that takes time (I am still getting my ass kicked at times and I've been training for almost 5 years now, lol), and everyone progresses at their own pace, some people are more "natural", while some take a bit more time. What worries me more is the fact that you're leaving each sparring session with a headache and a bloody nose, which to me suggests that either your sparring partners are going way too hard, in which case you need to say something as the sparring session is not intended for going 100% each time, it is not a fight, it is however, a time to work on all of the things that I mentioned above and it's hard to do that when you are constantly going at 100%, you shouldn't be feeling like your are fighting for your life in a sparring session...and also, you can't really condition your brain and the constant headaches after sparring are indicative of either subconcussive damage or a concussion (depending on what other symptoms you get in addition to the headaches), which will make for a rather short "career" in fighting or even being able to train for fun if you are not planning to fight as all that damage to the head is cumulative and I would say that if you are going to fight, save the heavy shots to the head for your fights, not sparring...or alternatively, though I don't know whether it is the case for you, if you are yourself going with the same power as you would use on the pads in the sparring session because it seems to be the case with many beginners I saw that just don't know better, then it would be a natural response for you sparring partner to hit back hard if you are hitting them hard, so then things are just escalating and there is no working on the technique, etc.

 

 

Reduce power, work on defense and proper techniques. Most people have to train 12-18 months at our gym before they are allowed to spar (varies by their natural ability and if they have prior experience). You can't regenerate brain cells so don't waste them on bad sparring.

 

I've read both of your comments and you are probably both more than right. I think am i trying to do as if i was training BJJ and sparring from day one, but the difference in being that BJJ is grappling while Muay thai i am getting kicked all over :P. I'm going to train more technique and maybe try the sparring after a couple months.


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#5
Fighting Frog

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If you're getting significantly hurt each time you spar then there is something wrong - you're not ready for it/your sparring partner is not ready. I would say back off, work on pads and the bag until you are confident and controlled and your basic technique is solidly there. Then spar with someone who is much much better than you; someone with excellent technique and control, so you can learn. When you are okay with that then start light sparring with other people.

I got royally thumped on the nose this morning while training (I was trying for a quick double whammy and ploughed heavily in just as my trainer popped a quick one through my guard - only I was coming in like an express train - my fault) but even so not hard enough to make it bleed or rattle my head. Yes, one is going to get hurt while sparring occasionally, it stands to reason; but it shouldn't be happening every time, and not badly, and certainly not when one is first sparring.

Mind you, I can see why you are so keen to get in there, especially as you are used to BJJ! (which always looks to me as horribly dangerous and rough!) Good luck with your MT work.


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#6
Gregor

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 how long until i stop being a human punching bag? :P

I've had a grand total of three one hour technical sessions, and followed by 3 hours of sparring. I think a lot of people will tell me i shouldn't be sparring so soon after only 3 hours of learning technique,

One can't give a generalized answer to this. Your BJJ training will surely be helpful in some way, but I would generally advise against continuing sparring if you are unfamiliar with even the basic techniques such as, presumably, checking a low kick.


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#7
radarjam

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I think its only a matter of how much time have you invested in sparring; your skills/mental game will get better eventually. I can't say for sure on how long it will take you to get comfortable or good. I do believe in hard work....and hard work pays off. :D 

If you're still getting the hang of it, try sparring with your partners "technical and light" however if they're being an asshole [going more than 40%] tell them that they're going too hard - if they don't comply, go find a new partner. Its not fun getting rattled around, getting injured or hurt after training. Everyone in the gym is there to learn, respect each other, and have fun. 

PS. I do recommend on practicing on your breathing technique as well, as it helps so much with keeping your composure/control. 


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#8
Muay Thai Addict

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depends whether you are planning to become a pro or an amateur fighter. It also depends whether you are already physically fit and can start learning techniques straight away or you have to start from a scratch and build up strength and stamina before you do anything else. A philosophy of a Muay Thai, which you can trace to Thailand and Thai traditions, is based around competition: to prepare fighters to compete with the others, to be a ring ready fighter. Muay Thai gyms will follow that philosophy. In most of the good gyms a great pressure in put on sparring and full-power sparring as a main tool of teaching (and learning). Like you probably know, there is no belt system in Muay Thai so instead an inter gym competitions will give you the sense of progress and an achievement.

This website's blogs can help any question regarding Muay Thai Fighting: http://www.muaythaiaddict.com






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