Jump to content

Welcome to Muay Thai Roundtable
Welcome to the Muay Thai Roundtable, the only Muay Thai forum of its kind, with a verified Women Only section. If you are new do create an account by registering as a member, creating a username and password (the Facebook login no longer works). After registration you'll get a validation email with a link. Please verify your email through this link. We hand clear every user for the General Section so it may take 24 to 48 hours so thanks for your patience. If you are a female user, after you have become a validated member please send Sylvie an email at sylvie AT 8limbs.us so she can verify your gender for the Women Only section.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

Thinking About Style - Things I'm Working On

- - - - - style muay thai technique

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Staff

  • Moderator
  • 828 posts
  • LocationPattaya, Thailand

I've written before about the troubles I've had with a kind of Style (the post takes a while to load, lots of GIFs), and being forced into a style that wasn't "me", or at least that I had a really hard time bringing forward. I just wasn't an evasive, tricky, or dodge-y person. It wasn't until I discovered that there was a different style, a forward, space-eating style that I was set more free. I remember the beginning of realizing this was something that Andy Thomson said: "There is not one Muay Thai, there are 1,000s. Each person has their own Muay Thai."

The yesterday I wrote about the Things I'm Working On and a lot of them have to do with my style, and how to best bring it out. These things involve body punches, overhands, clinching hips in, taking space, not rushing. 

I wanted to post here because a lot of us feel like we want to measure up to "a" Muay Thai. We want to do it "right". There definitely are right and wrong ways to do things, but there is not the one way to do a particular thing. 

You don't need to be a fighter to think about style. What is your style, and what are you doing to pursue it?


  • dtrick924 likes this

ways to connect with me:

8limbs.us blog   Twitter @_ittu   Instagram sylviemuay   Google Plus  YouTube lots of videos   LinkedIn  and on Facebook 


#2
ขุนเข่า

ขุนเข่า

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

Your old post about finding your style is still one of my favorite blog posts.  I have found myself telling my students to find their own style of Muay Thai.  It also helps remind me that my job as their coach is to help them find their own style, not necessarily to mold them into MY style.  Sure, I teach my style of Muay Thai, but with my eyes towards helping them find their own way to express themselves.

I find myself nodding along wholeheartedly with your comments regarding scoring faster in the clinch.  One of the things that I try very hard to impress upon my students/fighters is that you don't use the clinch to setup your strikes (knees, then elbows)... rather, you use your knees (and elbows) to setup your clinch.  I want my students to immediately begin attacking with knees the moment they reach forward and touch their opponent.  Basically, we focus on reaching to control your opponents arms (biceps), attack with knees, transition to clinching with more knees and/or elbows.

In regards to the hook while rotating your core first, then punching....  that is ONE way of doing it.  I favor the practice of everything moving together as one solid unit.  That's not to say that is the only method I employ or teach, but its the method I focus on.  It's my "core" method, so to speak...  I use the method of moving my core first, then punching when I throw the hook that some people refer to as the "Russian Hook" or "Casting Punch".  (same same)

Wall of China?  LOL!  You and I have discussed this before.  The 2nd method you mention of pushing the leg down is my preferred counter...  but are you pushing down with your hand or using your own knee to push your opponent's down?  Your blog post is unclear on that point...

I feel you on "snapping the jab"...  I've recently begun helping a fighter learn to snap his jab.  It's something that I've learned to do on my own, and finding a way to describe to him what I want has been a challenge in that I'm sure what I'm telling him and showing him makes sense, but its just not "clicked" with him yet.  But reading your post reminds me of an analogy one of my boxing coaches used to explain it....  snapping a towel at someone!  (I'm going to use that analogy with him the next time we train and see if it helps!)

I love the term "scratch" to describe the scenario, especially late in a fight.  It's an attitude, really, and I feel that it leads directly into your comments on persuasion & authority....  It's like there's a level of scrappiness/aggressiveness you must demonstrate & maintain throughout an entire fight, but you must do so intelligently.  You can't just charge in, it's not the same thing!  But then, I'm preaching to the choir on that subject!  ;)


  • K. von Duuglas-Ittu and Sylvie like this

-Brooks

www.tcbfights.com

 


#3
michelle

michelle

    Committed Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location27520
I don't yet know my Own style. But I don't move quick.. I feel almost like I'm lumbering along through the moves. I'm not a Stalker (not yet anyways). Rather,during practice I tend to ... Sit and wait for lack of a better term. I'm still unfamiliar with myself and what I can do, but I know enough that I sit and wait. Which I don't think is necessarily a good thing.
  • K. von Duuglas-Ittu likes this

#4
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Staff

  • Moderator
  • 828 posts
  • LocationPattaya, Thailand

In regards to the hook while rotating your core first, then punching....  that is ONE way of doing it.  I favor the practice of everything moving together as one solid unit.  That's not to say that is the only method I employ or teach, but its the method I focus on.  It's my "core" method, so to speak...  I use the method of moving my core first, then punching when I throw the hook that some people refer to as the "Russian Hook" or "Casting Punch".  (same same)

Yeah, like Master K's robot arm, where you just swing the whole body around and the fist torpedos! He'd lightly nudge me with his knuckles when he demonstrated and even that made me want to cry... so powerful.

The push-down on the Wall of China is with the hand, very fast, hips in first to create pressure, then relaxed at that moment - followed by an immediate knee. It is very effective. There are other counters but I'm trying to minimize my options so that I don't get caught thinking so much.


ways to connect with me:

8limbs.us blog   Twitter @_ittu   Instagram sylviemuay   Google Plus  YouTube lots of videos   LinkedIn  and on Facebook 


#5
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Staff

  • Moderator
  • 828 posts
  • LocationPattaya, Thailand

I don't yet know my Own style. But I don't move quick.. I feel almost like I'm lumbering along through the moves. I'm not a Stalker (not yet anyways). Rather,during practice I tend to ... Sit and wait for lack of a better term. I'm still unfamiliar with myself and what I can do, but I know enough that I sit and wait. Which I don't think is necessarily a good thing.

Sounds like you're on your way to being a counter striker.


ways to connect with me:

8limbs.us blog   Twitter @_ittu   Instagram sylviemuay   Google Plus  YouTube lots of videos   LinkedIn  and on Facebook 


#6
Micc

Micc

    Roundtable Nak Muay

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 290 posts
  • LocationPoland

This is exactly why I love your blog, Sylvie! I never knew there were different styles of fighting, of course, I intuitively felt there might be different styles, but it's different when you see it written down and described :)

I'm still a little bit like Michelle, I still don't know what my body is capable of, sometimes I'm surprised by it, sometimes I'm dissapointed. What I've heard from people, they say I have kind of my own style: I constantly go forward, don't show off spectacular moves, just keep pressuring the opponent. But I also let go, just like in training and "reset" the fight ;)

It's funny, because this is what other say, watching from the sidelines. What I feel in the ring is completely different. I try not to get punched, I try to attack first, and I'm trying out my best moves, maybe not wanting to show off, but wanting the opponent to take me seriously. Basically, when I see someone is taking me lightly (this happens a lot, I usually spar with young adult guys) I throw a backfist or a ushiro mawashi geri (spin back kick?). Even if the hit doesn't land (which it usually does with someone taking me lightly) it make the opponent shift gears. So I kind of think about it as showing off.

I think I'm definitely more of the "aesthetic" fighter, femur whas it? I like when the technique looks good and is effective as well, but I'd rather hit with good technique than strong. At least that is my opinion at this point in time.


  • Sylvie likes this

Muay Thai Rebel <- blog about my Muay Thai experience in Poland 
miccmilena <- Instagram

https://youtu.be/MZ7JyCF_8bw -> short summary video of my training trip to Thailand ^_^


#7
ขุนเข่า

ขุนเข่า

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

Yeah, like Master K's robot arm, where you just swing the whole body around and the fist torpedos! He'd lightly nudge me with his knuckles when he demonstrated and even that made me want to cry... so powerful.

 

OMG!  This is why I miss Master K so much!  He had the most hilarious (but effective!) analogies for EVERYTHING!  I still train with a number of his former students, and we have tried to compile a list of "K-isms" for posterity.  We all crack up when we review the list we've compiled....


  • Sylvie likes this

-Brooks

www.tcbfights.com

 


#8
ขุนเข่า

ขุนเข่า

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

The push-down on the Wall of China is with the hand, very fast, hips in first to create pressure, then relaxed at that moment - followed by an immediate knee. It is very effective. There are other counters but I'm trying to minimize my options so that I don't get caught thinking so much.

 

 

Again, you and I seem to share brain cells sometimes!  LOL!  While my preferred method to break the Wall of China is using my knees to push it down and "walk over", I'm TOTALLY with you on keeping things simple and choosing 1 method that works for me (or teaching my students to choose 1 method that really works for THEM!).  I do this throughout training.... teach a variety of methods to achieve the same goal, then let my students practice to discover the 1 that suits them best.

It's like that clinch knee combo that Kaensak taught you.  2 quick knees, step with the opposite foot and pivot in place, then slam a knee into their exposed ribs while they're off balance....  (one of your many video blogs, not sure if you remember the specific one).  Or the escape/counter to the body clinch that Kaensak taught me....  These are great techniques to know and I teach them to my students.  However, when it comes time to begin fight training, many techniques such as those mentioned get dropped from the aresenal in favor of simpler, more direct techniques that are easier to execute in a high-stress situation such as an actual fight.

...which goes back to what you've mentioned about the importance of "play" in Muay Thai.  Those more intricate moves not only work but are effective, but only after lots of practice.  "Play" in Muay Thai is absolutely essential for these techniques to be mastered, but its a concept that the American mindset/style of training still greatly struggles with.


  • K. von Duuglas-Ittu, Sylvie and dtrick924 like this

-Brooks

www.tcbfights.com

 


#9
kellyc

kellyc

    Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • LocationThailand
My style is 'survival' haha
  • Sylvie and threeoaks like this

#10
michelle

michelle

    Committed Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location27520
Counter striker ?

#11
threeoaks

threeoaks

    Roundtable Nak Muay

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 297 posts
  • LocationUpstate NY
Counter strikers are da bes. The evil strategist. She who waits, bates & strikes, remaining totally relaxed.
  • Sylvie likes this

#12
Steph

Steph

    Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • LocationBangkok

Just out of curiosity, what are some archetypal styles that you guys have seen in fighters?

Outside of MT in striking sports I've heard of terms like "out-fighter" that I'm not entirely familiar with along with the more obvious "boxer" and etc.


  • Sylvie likes this

#13
michelle

michelle

    Committed Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location27520
Oooh threeoaks, that would be pretty accurate actually. Still working on the completely relaxed part.
  • threeoaks likes this

#14
Wolfie.Gal

Wolfie.Gal

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • LocationMalaysia
Tbh, I'm still figuring it out. I find out I love to use the knees and clinch method during sparring (if allowed) or training. It's where my strength lies. But during a fight, things just don't turn out exactly like you wanted as always.. hahahahha.. I have noticed I usually get bashed up by opponent in first round and then change my gear during second round.. I like to circle around the ring, wearing my opponent down and when they come in - I will throw a punch and a kick move to the side / teep them until they can't follow my pace. It will end up with lots of knees from there onwards or elbows if allowed.. << This usually happened when most of my opponent are punchers instead of both.. I dislike punchers =.=, no offense made there..
 
But sometimes it gets really frustrating because I want to do clinch not punch and kick only.. But, oh well I can't hope it goes out like what I planned before the fight.. XD

  • Sylvie likes this

#15
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Staff

  • Moderator
  • 828 posts
  • LocationPattaya, Thailand

My style is 'survival' haha

Hahaha, I thought your style was "Irish." :)


ways to connect with me:

8limbs.us blog   Twitter @_ittu   Instagram sylviemuay   Google Plus  YouTube lots of videos   LinkedIn  and on Facebook 


#16
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Staff

  • Moderator
  • 828 posts
  • LocationPattaya, Thailand

Just out of curiosity, what are some archetypal styles that you guys have seen in fighters?

Outside of MT in striking sports I've heard of terms like "out-fighter" that I'm not entirely familiar with along with the more obvious "boxer" and etc.

In western boxing they have the "boxer" vs. the "puncher," which is supposed to be the difference between someone who is very technical and cereberal and someone who hits to hurt, but not quite a "brawler"

In Muay Thai I've seen "inside fighters"; "knee fighters"; "counter strikers"; "boxers" (Pornsenae and Pakorn); "defensive" (Sam A); Saenchai is often called "feemeur" but I don't fully agree because he stays in the pocket even though he's evasive; "counter fighter"; "tricky fighter" (that's Saenchai to me); "cocky" is what I'd call Kaensak's style, in a good way; "book" is like a forward pressure fighter, like Thanonchai (my favorite); I'd call Sangmanee "feemeur"...


  • K. von Duuglas-Ittu, Kaitlinrose, Cilla and 1 other like this

ways to connect with me:

8limbs.us blog   Twitter @_ittu   Instagram sylviemuay   Google Plus  YouTube lots of videos   LinkedIn  and on Facebook 


#17
Steph

Steph

    Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • LocationBangkok

In western boxing they have the "boxer" vs. the "puncher," which is supposed to be the difference between someone who is very technical and cereberal and someone who hits to hurt, but not quite a "brawler"

In Muay Thai I've seen "inside fighters"; "knee fighters"; "counter strikers"; "boxers" (Pornsenae and Pakorn); "defensive" (Sam A); Saenchai is often called "feemeur" but I don't fully agree because he stays in the pocket even though he's evasive; "counter fighter"; "tricky fighter" (that's Saenchai to me); "cocky" is what I'd call Kaensak's style, in a good way; "book" is like a forward pressure fighter, like Thanonchai (my favorite); I'd call Sangmanee "feemeur"...

 Thanks for the insight Sylvie, I heard about the "femur" Muay Thai fighters vs. the more aggressive fighters from your blog post, but I had no idea there were so many different aspects!! I think I'm going to go take a look at each of the fighters you've mentioned here to see if I can sort of scope out what each style means in practice...



#18
Steph

Steph

    Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 61 posts
  • LocationBangkok

http://www.muay-thai...hai-styles.html

Just saw this post by Sean Fagan, thought it would be a nice addition to the thread.


  • Lobo11 and LittleBritt00 like this

#19
michelle

michelle

    Committed Contributor

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
  • Location27520
Erm, I don't know if this is a style question or not, but are there fighters who utilize both traditional and southpaw stances equally? I'd like to get acquainted with them and their style and how they train.

#20
ขุนเข่า

ขุนเข่า

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationWashington, DC

Erm, I don't know if this is a style question or not, but are there fighters who utilize both traditional and southpaw stances equally? I'd like to get acquainted with them and their style and how they train.

 

Yes, there are definitely "switch" fighters....  I'm trying to think of any notable ones, but for some reason I'm drawing a blank right now.  I'll poke around to see if I can find something....


-Brooks

www.tcbfights.com

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: style, muay thai, technique

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users